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Tomlinson Kong Contemporary
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Ken Fandell at The Contemporary Museum_ Honolulu_ Hawaii
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Ken Fandell at The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii
POSTED: August 24, 2011

In Fall 2011, Ken Fandell will be installing a site-specific wallpaper installation at The Contemporary Museum, Honolulu, Hawaii. Entitled, "Finger" the installation shows different angles and bends of the artist's finger pointing and looping in every direction while taking a twisted route. This reference to how convoluted one's logic can get involves many implications through the use of the ubiquitous pointed finger -- a subject that often symbolizes something accusatory or blaming in relationship to others. To read an interview with Fandell about related work, click the link below.

http://chicagoist.com/2009/08/24/an_interview_with_ken_fandell.php

 
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Pulse Art Fair_ Miami_ December 2014
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Pulse Art Fair, Miami, December 2014
POSTED: December 04, 2013

 
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Lower East Side Gallery Stroll
Sunday_ March 10th_ from 12-6PM
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Lower East Side Gallery Stroll Sunday, March 10th, from 12-6PM
POSTED: March 04, 2013

Visit 50+ Lower East Side galleries for a gallery stroll on Sunday, March 10th from noon-6PM during Armory Arts Week.

Click "Download Document" below for the MAP.

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ARTnews
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Jordi Alcaraz_ DEIXANTS I PORTES_BR_
review by Annette M. Rose-Shapiro
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ARTnews
Jordi Alcaraz: DEIXANTS I PORTES
review by Annette M. Rose-Shapiro
POSTED: October 02, 2012

Jordi Alcaraz’s deeply emotional and cerebral show, Deixants I Portes (Wakes and Doors), featured nearly two dozen paintings and a few sculptures. The Catalan artist uses simple, inexpensive materials and builds his own heavy wooden frames. Tearing, gouging, and burning through the thin paper and cardboard of his booklike assemblages, Alcaraz reveals each layer as a way of producing “drawings.” His enigmatic markings are made with ink, glass, staples, and bits of wire, effectively challenging the viewer to write the story. Alcaraz manipulates the glass or acrylic he uses to protect each piece, adding shadows, lines, and an unexpected depth.
Llibre D’astronomía (II), 2012, is a tattered book, crudely bound with butcher’s string. Its pages, all lacking text, are marked with large pools of black paint that form a constellation of sorts. But the acrylic covering has been melted inward, making these “stars” look more like black holes in space.
Alcaraz introduces an additional dimension to his sculptures by engaging the acrylic of the vitrines that contain them. A molded paraffin headlike shape in Somiar (Dream), 2012, pushes against the side of the vitrine, as if trying to escape from a nightmare. It’s a subtle, yet arresting, gesture.
One of the more minimal works in the show was Procés Per Fixar Idees (I), 2012. The book’s images are composed of bits of broken acrylic, stapled to its pages or affixed with wire. One illegible word, written in soft pencil, is the only text in evidence. The book appears to have exploded in a violent way, spitting out bits of broken acrylic and staples, suggesting a possible story line yet to be written. It clearly reflects Alcaraz’s particularly Catalan surrealist bent.
—Annette M. Rose-Shapiro

http://www.tomlinsonkong.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=51

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HOUSTON FINE ART FAIR
POSTED: September 06, 2012

TKC will be exhibiting at the Houston Fine Art Fair, Booth 105

September 14th - 16th Reliant Center, Houston, TX

Featuring new and recent work by: Jordi Alcaraz, Ken Fandell, Johannes Girardoni & Christopher Kurtz

http://www.houstonfineartfair.com

 
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artcritical

Christopher Kurtz: Longhand
review by Karen Gover
POSTED: September 06, 2012

“Longhand” proves an apt title for Christopher Kurtz’s four-piece show at Tomlinson Kong Contemporary. On a formal level, Kurtz’s sculptures suggest the lines and shapes of handwriting. Two of the pieces, "Litany" and "Act Together," resemble the baroque swirls of cursive script made three-dimensional. The slender quills of the other two pieces, "Palace" and "The Gloaming," suggest a different graphic sensibility: neat and formal, yet still bearing the trace of the hand, these forms etch soft black lines in space to create volume and void.

And yet, "Longhand" suggests not only formal associations of handwriting but the manual, painstaking process by which these sculptures were made. Kurtz, who is also a furniture designer, is a master carpenter. Each of the hand-carved pieces exemplifies some particular aspect of his technical prowess: his ability to make wood curl and loop back around itself in improbable ways; to carve bass-wood into long, needle-thin spikes; to create invisible seams that join two pieces as if they had always been one. The sculptures in "Longhand" do not apologize for the evident labor and skill that they require, but nor do they belabor the point. Carpentry is in service to Kurtz’s art, but this is not art about carpentry...

Click below to read complete review.

http://www.artcritical.com/2012/09/04/christopher-kurtz/

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The Brooklyn Rail

Christopher Kurtz: Longhand
review by Robert C. Morgan
POSTED: September 04, 2012

Christopher Kurtz is a sculptor who works in wood. His work moves between natural winding branches and pointed stick-like forms. Either way, his approach to sculpture is a classical one. It contains a will to order, one that is less about power than balance. While Nietzsche may linger in the shadows, the articulation of proportions is more given to Chuang-Tzu. The content is only a matter of degree. A subtle tilt or bend in the wood will determine the work’s expressive potential. Kurtz’s sense of ordering is generally more spatial than formal. Whether thinly carved wooden spears shoot out from a central hub into the space around them or a large fallen branch becomes the readymade design for a winding linear form, Kurtz follows the course of his observations and thought. His work may recall three-dimensional asterisks, such as bursting planetary orbs, or it may suggest a ribbon-like estuary that flows until it becomes fixed in time like a meandering glacier. Regardless of his sources, the structure within each piece of work remains clear and incisive. The resolution is less about pre-determination than a process that engenders discovery...

Click below to read complete artical.

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Artforum.com

Christopher Kurtz: Longhand
review by Allese Thomson
POSTED: August 29, 2012

Critic's Pick

Christopher Kurtz approaches sculpture with the meticulous dexterity of a trained craftsman. To create Litany, 2012, arguably the centerpiece of his first solo exhibition in New York, the artist routinely woke before daybreak to hand-carve maple, oak, and cedar into strips of wood, then gingerly pieced these together into a continuous beam that curves thirteen feet across the gallery and soars five feet toward the ceiling. In some places thick and heavy, in others nimbly slender, it swoops through the air, often branching into seamless, curling tendrils.

Litany is so delicate and so immaculate that it seems unbelievable the work was carved by hand. Kurtz has painted the sides of the beam a stark white and the top and bottom a coal black, which obscures the medium somewhat, causing the work to oscillate between what it is (wood, handcrafted) and what it seems (metal, machine-made). This dualism accentuates the capacity of wood to do things it often doesn’t do—twirl and spiral, pirouette and twist. It also highlights Kurtz’s process, notably the stunning levels of patience and attention required to make wood appear weightless.

What is significant about Litany, then—as opposed to some of the other works on view here, all impressive displays of technical prowess and execution—is the way Kurtz emphasizes the human quality of craftsmanship as a genre. Is it pitifully romantic to think the human hand may imbue an aesthetic object with a certain set of qualities that a machine cannot? Perhaps. What is certain, however, is that it is precisely the illusory choice of paint as well as the play of dimension that unravels these questions, pushing Litany firmly out of the realm of craft.

http://artforum.com/?pn=picks§ion=nyc#picks32264

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PULSE New York
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PULSE New York
POSTED: May 03, 2012

TKC will be exhibiting at the PULSE New York, Booth A10

The Metropolitan Pavilion
125 West 18th Street Chelsea
New York, NY 10011

FAIR HOURS:

Thursday, May 3, 12pm- 8pm
Friday, May 4, 10am-8pm
Saturday, May 5, 12pm-8pm
Sunday, May 6, 12pm-5pm

 
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The Wall Street Journal_ review by Peter Plagens_br_Johannes Girardoni_ _i_Lost-and Found__i_
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The Wall Street Journal

Johannes Girardoni: Lost-and-Found
review by Peter Plagens
POSTED: March 09, 2012

Much contemporary art floating around galleries these days couples aesthetic purity (e.g., the Minimalism of Dan Flavin) with nose-thumbing at a particular medium (e.g., John Baldessari's riffs on photography). This combo plate is exactly what Mr. Girardoni (b. 1967) offers up in an exhibition that's somehow much better in overall "feel" than in its irritatingly familiar parts.

The Baldessari-esque section consists of large color C-prints of the backs of billboards in the desert, a New York City street with construction scaffolding, and a gritty Los Angeles parking lot. They're mounted on aluminum and elegantly defaced with buttered-on rectangles of paint. They look, in a word, good. The Flavinlike component is made up of long cast-resin bars, backlighted in purple, that lean or lie around in a separate room. These are pretty nice, too. If it weren't for the faint, sci-fi music (an increasingly obligatory "sound" element in exhibitions), "Lost-and-Found" would totally transcend some of its arguable particulars and be a really convincing show.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203753704577253711545349758.html

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The Armory Show 2012
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The Armory Show 2012
POSTED: March 08, 2012

Tomlinson Kong Contemporary will be exhibiting at The Armory Show 2012, Booth 400, Pier 92
Pier 92 & 94
Twelfth Avenue at 55th Street
New York City


Public Hours:
Thursday, March 8 - Saturday, March 10th: 12pm to 8pm
Sunday, March 11: 12pm to 7pm

 
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News Archive

POSTED: March 03, 2012
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Christopher Kurtz at The Museum of Art and Design, New York
POSTED: October 26, 2011
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PULSE Miami Art Fair
December 1 - 4, 2011
POSTED: October 25, 2011
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Johannes Girardoni at the 54th Venice Biennale
"Personal Structures" curated by Karlyn De Jongh and Sarah Gold
June 4, 2011 - November 27, 2011
POSTED: August 10, 2011
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Johannes Girardoni's "Infinite Room"
POSTED: August 10, 2011
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Markus Linnenbrink, JVA/Prison in Duesseldorf Rath, Germany
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